Anonymous asked: "I wanted to share one thing with you, one story about how what you write online flipped my impression of autistic people around. I know a kid with Down's syndrome, and his parents have friends with an autistic kid who is an incredible artist. We were working on a project and they suggested using the kid's paintings. I said 'Awesome, if he wants to, that would be great'. And they said 'Oh, no, he's so autistic, there's no point even asking him, he won't understand.' 1/3"

realsocialskills:

dephinia:

youneedacat:

2/3 And I thought, wow, weird, but ok, they know this kid, they deal with developmentally disabled kids every day, they know better. And I didn’t think about it much. But then I read what you wrote about understanding, but not being able to respond. And it blew my mind. I thought of that kid, and how maybe asking him would have made perfect sense, because even if he can’t respond, that doesn’t mean he doesn’t get to be asked,

3/3and it doesn’t mean he doesn’t get to at least know what people want to do with his art. Even if he doesn’t have the capacity to voice his opinion about it. Thanks for writing about the way you do and don’t communicate, and explaining that lack of communication doesn’t equal lack of personhood or awareness. I will know that next time something like this happens, and maybe it will make a difference to the DD person it concerns.

Wow I’m seriously happy that people are asking him.

Something that made me cry, later, when I was capable of crying:

Sometimes I’m incapable of showing a single signal that I am aware of anything.  Nothing.  Not with my eyes, not with anything.

Normally, I’m accustomed to even people who know me, treating me different.  At least, their manner of talking to me and their voice changes, they get nervous.  At most…  I get to learn what they really think of me, because they talk about me as if I’m not even there, including complaining about me in terms that made it 100% clear that they would not say this if they thought I was present there with them.

So I was at AutCom and I’d just given a presentation.  It was super-crowded — the AutCom conference, 3 weddings, and a Bar Mitzvah, going on all at once in this hotel.  I had a killer migraine and I was overloaded and I’d just gotten through my presentation, which I’d given by lying on the floor writhing because I couldn’t get up.  One of those days.  When it was over, a bunch of us autistic people (all nonspeaking normally), all went out into the hall in various stages of shutdown.  Larry Bissonette was pacing.  I was leaning up against a wall and I couldn’t move or even focus my eyes or move my eyes in any way.

I love Sandra Radisch’s writing and I wish I’d had a chance to meet her when either of us was more communicative.  But her staff person came up to me to tell me what my presentation meant to her.  And she did not bat an eyelash, she did not change her way of speaking to me in the slightest, she talked to me as if she was talking to any random person, even though I had no prayer of even blinking my eyes in response to her at that point.

And that meant more to me than you could believe.

If this child gets talked to respectfully and as if people expect him to understand, then he will understand.  He may or may not understand the words.  There is no way of telling even whether a very verbal person understands the words.   He may understand every word said, or none, or it may vary day to day.  

But at minimum, he will understand what it means to be spoken to respectfully — people with receptive language problems tend to do better at picking up on emotional content like that, so if he doesn’t understand the words, he will doubtless understand the intent.  And he will begin to expect to be asked.  He will expect respect.  And when respect is not given, he will react badly.  And that is the beginning of self-advocacy for people with very severe communication impairments.

But he will also possibly remember the first time he was ever asked, for the rest of his life.  When nobody ever asks — it means the world.  It meant the world to me, and I’m nowhere near in the position of being underestimated as thoroughly as this boy is.  Talk to him. Include him.  Ask him things.  Talk even if you expect no response.  It will mean something to him.  It could mean everything to him.

"lack of communication doesn’t equal lack of personhood or awareness. "

^THIS, y’all.

We place so much emphasis on verbal communication that we forget that:

1) loudest does not equal right
2) most articulate/verbose does not equal right
3) there are other ways of communicating
4) which are no less valid
5) if someone has difficulty communicating in a typical or expected way that does not make what she/he wants to communicate invalid or unimportant
6) our lack of capacity to listen/understand does not equal lack of value/importance of the message!!

Listening and awareness are skills that must be practiced and developed as much as talking, and yet we learn so many anti-listening skills. LISTEN.

realsocialskills said:

Yes. And also, if you see others involved in someone’s care write that they “have no communication”, it’s particularly urgent to figure out ways they communicate and document them.

Even if you’re not sure. Even if they’re ambiguous. Document that. Eg “Bob says infrequent and hard to interpret words.” or “Bob waves his hand in response to questions”.

The consequences of being seen as incapable of communication can get really horrible really quickly, so if you’re in a position to counter that, do so.


wtfudgemichelle asked: "Lol if I was expecting a private message back I would've just texted you :p"

Lol I answer all asks from people I know privately. BUT HERE IS ALL MY LOVE AND ADORATION FOR YOU FOR ALL TO SEE.


Describe yourself on anon and I’ll say if I’d date you.

smutkhaleesi:

federyk-is-a-rising-demon:

thefaultinourdaleks:

federyk-is-a-rising-demon:

sheeptopus:

sad-wayward-fallen-angel:

mishasminions:

IT’S NOT NATURAL

you could say it’s un-natural

YOU HAD ONE JOB

it’s paranormal 

Definitely not-natural

almost-natural

natural-ish


spoken-not-written:

THIS IS THE GREATEST THING I HAVE EVER SEEN IN MY ENTIRE LIFE


just-one-wallflower:

this is my fucking favorite thing ever i love it so so so so much i cnt even explain its just s o goo d

just-one-wallflower:

this is my fucking favorite thing ever i love it so so so so much i cnt even explain its just s o goo d


takethedamncash:

This astronomical watch accurately tracks the position of the six planets visible from Earth. You can look down at your wrist at any time and know exactly where you are in the universe. (Also tells the time just in case you wanted that too) See more here


ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.
The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.
Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”
—
Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.
Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

ewilloughby:

Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.

The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.

Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”

Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.

Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.


"There are two reasons why people don’t talk about things; either it doesn’t mean anything to them, or it means everything"
Luna Adriana (via silly-luv)

kat-howard:

dbvictoria:

Shakespearean insults, with cats.

7 more here.

I did not realize how very perfect cats were at delivering Shakespeare’s insults until now.